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Wine: “How can wine be stored after opening?”

Effective Ways to Store Wines after Opening

Anyone who is preparing for the worst and hoping for the best wants to take steps to ensure that the entire family has enough food and water set aside to survive a disaster for as long as possible. This usually means storing lots of basic food items such as cans, beans, whole grains, powdered milk, and dehydrated foods.

Something that rarely comes up in these survival discussions is an issue that will be of prime importance to at least a few people, and that is, “How can wine be stored after opening?”

Anyone who appreciates a bottle of fine red wine knows how quickly the taste is altered after the bottle is opened and the wine is exposed to air. Oxygen is the culprit that interacts with wine molecules and starts to quickly change them to something much less palatable.  Sadly, there are not any truly effective ways to make a bottle of wine last a long time after it is opened.

A bottle of red wine will last up to three days if the cork is put back in the bottle and it is refrigerated. White wines can be corked and refrigerated for two days. Keep the bottle upright to minimize the surface area that is exposed to oxygen.

You can help make your wine last longer if you cork it again after each time you pour a glass.

Your bottle of red wine may last for up to ten days if you use a vacuum type wine saver. This will remove most of the air from the bottle to slow down the deterioration of the wine.  A vacuum pump for wine does not really create a true vacuum. This means that the wine will still be exposed to some air but the process of spoiling will slow down.   A wine preserver is a different device that adds a layer of inert gas that floats above the wine. This preserver can make white wines last a few days longer.   A sparkling wine stopper can be used for bottles of champagne and other bubbly wines. This stopper will help the wine stay drinkable for about three days.

One solution that will work for some is to purchase bottles of good sherry or port instead of wine. The higher alcohol content of sherry and port will preserve the contents from spoiling. Both sherry and port will have a rich taste and can be enjoyed after a fine meal.

If you are looking to purchase wine savers, vacuum pumps or other wine storage accessories, a great place to locate them is; www.vinumdesign.com.

 

 About the Guest Author: 

Kim S. writes for many online establishments and supports those ones that offer practical lifestyles to consumers. As a frugal living and emergency preparedness advocate, she recommends www.FoodInsurance.com for families and foodies who are looking for high quality food storage and emergency supplies. You may like Food Insurance in Facebook.

Photo:

Flickr – Koala Internacional

 

Editor's Note: Have a question or comment? Leave a message in the comments below.

vinnierecileVinnie recently joined the team at Wine and Food Travel as Editor in Chief. We are very excited to have her culinary experience and artistic background to draw from here at WAFT. Vinnie brings a wealth of experience in the culinary arts, professional writing and marketing. Her passion, expertise and her willingness to share her learnings with readers is a welcome contribution to the WAFT team. Vinnie also maintains a food blog where she shares many of her recipes, food experiences and adventures,

  • Barbara J Cloonan

    It would be a beautiful thing if wine pumps like “Vac U Vin” actually worked but alas, independent testing has shown that they don’t. The gas versions are slightly better but corking the bottle and putting it in the fridge works nearly as well and doesn’t cost anything. Truth is some wines, mostly reds, will keep a day or two or if you’re really lucky a few more, but most will change for the worse over time. Drink up, save it for cooking or make wine vinegar.

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